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Board Blog: Listen to my Mother

Dave Asplund, CBI Vice President

“I make my lists and list my dates” are words I heard mom every time she would have someone ask her how she could juggle working, advocating for special needs children/adults, painting, raising a teen, managing a husband, and being a Minister’s wife. She lived by her lists and had a color coding system in her date book what a given date or event was about. Guess what color her notebooks were for the lists she kept. Yep, the list notebooks matched her color coding system.

I am my mother’s son, and I have a Franklin Covey planner that I use daily.  But this is not a advertisement for Franklin Covey, it is a blog idea I thought of while I filled in the myriad of dates in my planner for the new semester. The entries start with two board meetings, a budget and planning meeting, board of regents meeting, three doctor appointm …  Well you get the picture for my next two weeks.  This blog is about organization and dates.

Organization is the hard part because no two people have the same way to organize.  My mother had her lists, date book, and files she kept.  I have my day planner, the stacks of papers/material I am working on now, and files I have put away for later.  My wife has her day planner, the files of her information, and the Library of Congress.  What works for me leaves my wife shaking her head, and that is why everyone needs to find their own organizational method.  Whether you use the very formal and structured like Franklin Covey’s “Productivity Practice,” The Pomodoro Technique, Order of Importance, David Allen’s “Getting Things Done” method, Seinfeld’s Productivity Secret/ Don’t Break the Chain, the Action Method, or combining some/all of multiple methods to find the best way that works for you it is important to find that method or combo. I was trying to think of a good place to start and the public/college library was my answer until my son said “just Google it, dad” for methods of organization. Just a hint, I used ‘methods of organization’ in the search window.

The dates are easy.  As a student you have dates for assignments, group meetings, class meetings, extracurricular events, school events, work shifts, etc. As a college advisor, instructor, or staff member you have dates for department meetings, work shifts, planning sessions, family stuff, radio/TV stuff, university events, etc.  Any group you belong to has dates, tasks, and things you need to remember. Your college radio or TV station has a list of dates all their own along with things you need to do. The CBI website (askcbi.org) is an excellent place to find the published dates for this year, including Feb. 17, 2017, the date nominations must be received by for the offices of Secretary, Development Director and Student Member on the Board of Directors.

By | January 26th, 2017|Board Blogs|Comments Off on Board Blog: Listen to my Mother

Student Media in the News

Community Broadcaster: The Selling of a College Radio Station

Community radio advocates were upset when the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth announced plans to sell its WUMD(FM) signal space to Rhode Island Public Radio. This was not new as several college stations over the last few years have been sold. Those passionate about community radio often ask how they can fight back against these trends.

Read more from Radio World.

Student-Owned WUVA, Inc. Sells FM Radio License to Endow WUVANews.com Video and Print News Enterprise

After operating a Charlottesville radio station for 70 years, including 37 years as a commercial FM station, today the University of Virginia student-owned media organization, WUVA, Inc., announced that it has agreed to sell its radio station  WUVA-FM 92.7 to Saga Communications, Inc. (NYSE – MKT: SGA).

Read more from Charlottesville Tomorrow.

Plus, Spinning Indie visits KCHUNG in Los Angeles, and the 77th Podcast episode.

By | January 24th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Proposed WUMD sale hits sour note with volunteers and listeners

Unhappy DJs, station volunteers and listeners are speaking out on social media after word of the proposed $1.5 million sale of WUMD 89.3 FM to Rhode Island Public Radio.

A move to save the station, which marks its 45th anniversary Friday, has also sparked the creation of a SAVEWUMD Facebook page.

 “This (WUMD) is what keeps me going,” said Toni Pennacchia, a radio volunteer since 1996 and a former UMass Dartmouth student, who produces a weekly program called “Spoiler Alert.”

Read more from South Coast Today.

Battle Emerges Over RI Public Radio Acquiring UMass Dartmouth Radio Station

WUMD staff and supporters, however, have organized to try to stop the acquisition, citing the diminishment of local radio in the south coast of Massachusetts.

“They’re hurting southeast Massachusetts, where WUMD’s programs have been heard,” said Toni Marie Pennacchia, who disc jockeys for WUMD. “We’ve been around 45 years this Friday, I’ve been a volunteer since 1996.”

Read more from GoLocalProv.com.

Plus, more on the sale from Radio Survivor and Providence Journal.

Helena, MT Noncommercial FM Construction Permit Donated To Montana State University

Last Chance Public Radio Association is donating the construction permit for a new noncommercial FM in Helena, Mont. to Montana State University – Billings (Yellowstone Public Radio) in a deal conditioned on YPR concurrently swapping KYPH/East Helena, Mont. to the Board of Regents of Montana University System in exchange for K251AC/Helena.

Read more from AllAccess.com.

Student Broadcasters Mingle in the City of Brotherly Love

Podcasting, social media, ’zines, LPFM, the FCC and journalism were among the topics tackled at College Broadcasters Inc.’s fifth annual National Student Electronic Media Convention. Held in Philadelphia in October, the event drew a crowd of some 420 paid attendees in addition to guest speakers and sponsors.

Read more from Radio World.

 

Plus, hear how Clemson’s game-winning touchdown sounded on the radio and the latest College Radio Watch column.

By | January 17th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Board Blog: The Umbrella Adviser

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Last spring, I took a graduate course in project management. The textbook talked about the role of the project sponsor, essentially the “cheerleader” for the project, and showed a clip art umbrella labeled project sponsor protecting the project team from rain. The more I looked at the picture, the more I thought it was a perfect symbol to represent my role as a student media adviser.

Jamie Lynn Gilbert, CBI Secretary

Jamie Lynn Gilbert, CBI Treasurer

In many ways, an adviser does serve as an umbrella to “protect” students from harsh conditions. I advocate on behalf of my students to upper administration. I ensure we have insurance on our transmitter. I certify all our concert performers have university-approved contracts and our bills are paid on time. I file FCC ownership reports and place quarterly issues and programs lists in the public file. I have difficult conversations about how to fire staff who aren’t meeting expectations and, if asked, sit in the room during the actual termination to show my support. I help prioritize task lists and serve as institutional memory. Most of all, I’m there for whatever they need.

As I kept looking at that picture, though, I realized that a good adviser also knows when to close that umbrella. Keeping my students in the shade doesn’t allow them to grow. They book their own concert performers. They lead their own staff meetings. They select their own music and write their own news stories. They decide what design to put on a T-shirt and the DJ shift attendance policy. I am more than happy to talk over any decision and offer my advice, but ultimately they have the final say.

Sometimes my students make mistakes. They hire the wrong people who end up quitting mid-semester, they don’t promote an event far enough in advance and it has poor attendance, or they forget to turn on their guest’s microphone. And that’s okay. Sometimes I can see the mistake coming a mile away and just let it happen, because it’s okay to get rained on sometimes.

 

 

By | January 11th, 2017|Board Blogs|Comments Off on Board Blog: The Umbrella Adviser

Accepting Nominations for Board Positions

DEADLINE FOR NOMINATIONS HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO MARCH 6, 2017

College Broadcasters, Inc. (CBI) is now accepting nominations for the offices of Secretary, Development Director and Student Member. The Secretary and Development Director are each 3-year terms beginning December 1, 2017. The Student Member is a one year term beginning May 1, 2017. To be considered, nominations must be received by Ed Arke (earke@messiah.edu), Election Commissioner (self-nominations are accepted).

The Qualifications for the board are: Directors must be duly appointed proxies of a Media Member; a maximum of one (1) Director may be proxied from any one (1) Media Member. An individual serving as a Student Director must maintain full-time undergraduate or graduate student status at the member institution for the duration of his or her term of office. A Faculty/Staff Director shall include any individual holding a faculty, administrative, or supervisory position associated with a Media Member.

The election of new Board positions will be held this spring and the results will be announced via the listservs. For more information related to the qualifications and duties, please visit the bylaws page. I hope you’ll seriously consider nominating a colleague or yourself for this great opportunity to serve our organization.
Please direct all nominations and correspondence to:
Edward T. Arke
CBI Election Commissioner
Messiah College
One College Ave. Suite 3038
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055
earke@messiah.edu

By | January 11th, 2017|About CBI, CBI News|Comments Off on Accepting Nominations for Board Positions

Board Blog: Radio is Multimedia Now

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“Seven years of college down the drain!” – despite the great quote from Animal House, thankfully I have learned something in college (and it only took four years).

But as my role runs the calendar year, it is time to wrap up my career in college radio, and graduate in the spring. What will I do without radio? Who knows. But after working at WSUM and WLTL for a total of eight years, I’ve learned some key skills in radio that have helped me become a better person.

The biggest thing that I found that was key to a successful radio station was learning that radio is more than just learning about what new album came out – radio is becoming more and more a multimedia outlet.

Evan Boyd, CBI Student Representative

Evan Boyd, CBI Student Representative

At WSUM, the majority of shows are music shows, with different genres and many artists that I’ve never heard of. It is great to hear different perspectives on various genres. As a result, the majority of people on WSUM’s executive staff have music shows and know a lot about music. But radio cannot stop there! Nowadays, a radio station can be expressed online through social media, through video, and through non-music audio.

If you are a radio station that does not fully incorporate social media, now is the time. Have constant updates about events on Facebook, tweet and retweet DJs, and take pictures to put on Instagram and Snapchat. It might even require having a select few on the team to take one platform, or have a social media director.

Video is huge today, especially since everyone can do it with a phone. WSUM has bands to play live on the air, but also video tapes them to be put up on our website. Sit down with a DJ and do a face-to-face interview with them on what they play and why they like radio! Taking advantage of popular trends going on can make good videos. When the Harlem Shake and Mannequin Challenge were popular, it was the perfect time to make a video. These are just some ideas on how to incorporate videos into an audio platform.

It is also important to recognize other platforms of on-air material, like talk shows, sports, news, etc. Some of the best broadcasts WSUM has done is call Wisconsin’s basketball team during March Madness, or be able to do a live broadcast the night of the presidential election. Sure, not everybody likes sports for example, but it does not mean that the top members at the radio station should avoid communicating with those that do.

Podcasting has become increasingly popular. I started a podcast with a friend that works at a different college radio station (shout out to KJHK at Kansas) that is up for an award in Wisconsin. The best part about podcasts is that they can be about anything – favorite artists, new music, or even live shows coming up. The biggest thing with podcasts is sitting down and taking the time to actually doing it – commitment is a key skill to have.

As silly as it sounds, college radio is not a music station, but a radio station – a multimedia outlet. These are some of the ways to make the radio station more than just a group of people who like listening to music. I love music, but I also love sports and video, and was able to bring all of it to a radio station. Coming in with this perspective everyday opens your horizons on how to make the station better in more ways than one. This attitude made my experience in radio the best thing I could have possibly done in high school and college.

 

By | December 28th, 2016|Board Blogs|Comments Off on Board Blog: Radio is Multimedia Now

Board Blog: Our new Secretary goes live

Hello, everyone.

Paul Crutcher, CBI Secretary

My name is Paul Crutcher and I am the Broadcast and Emerging Media Specialist at Lander University in Greenwood, South Carolina. I teach two radio production courses here and serve as General Manager for XLR – Lander University Radio. It is a great honor to be elected as interim secretary for the CBI board. I look forward to working with the existing leadership as we continue to champion the cause for college broadcasters.

“Going live” on social media has become a trendy thing to do over the past few months. Luckily, college broadcasters have a head start on the trend.  Maybe you went live the first time you were alone in the radio studio. Your training was over, all of your friends left, and it was just you, a microphone and your audience. Perhaps you went live the first time you were at the anchor desk, IFB in your ear, trying to get in rhythm with the teleprompter operator, reading the opening and first few stories. Maybe you went live directing a newscast or when you conducted an audio interview with a community leader for the first time.

I feel very passionate about protecting college media as a safe place for students to go live expressing creative freedom and developing career-building skills. It is beyond novelty, in my book.  It’s been a great pleasure to see students put in the hard work – those who are dedicated – and see them connect with faculty and staff members, their peers and their listeners or viewers advancing on in the field or other respective careers.

I look forward to working with each of you over the next year.

 

By | December 21st, 2016|Board Blogs|Comments Off on Board Blog: Our new Secretary goes live

Student Media in the News

WSOU collects over 600 pounds of food for local foodbank

As part of its commitment to community service, student-run WSOU 89.5 FM at Seton Hall University once again participated in the “Students Change Hunger” program, collecting 640 pounds of food for the Community Food Bank of New Jersey.  The haul was 300 pounds more than was collected by the station last year and is the largest amount of food the WSOU has gathered since it began its annual food drive.

Read more from WSOU.

At the studios of Dog River Radio, WNUB-FM, the programs are colorful and eclectic

“Listeners of WNUB only hear what goes into producing our own live shows,” said Colin Tarpey, 23, a political science major from Cohasset, Mass. “Unlike big time stations, we are fully responsible for managing every aspect of our shows, which can be a challenge.”

Read more from The Guidon.

On the Bright Side: SUNY Oneonta gives TV studio to OHS

A.J. Hecox, an OHS teacher who runs the broadcast communications class, said the equipment from SUNY Oneonta will be set up in his classroom, which has been converted into a studio. There are 16 students in the class, he said.

“This is a very, very exciting prospect,” Hecox said Thursday. “It’s exciting. I don’t think we’ve had anything like this here before. We live in a culture of consumption and we constantly talk about in class how we’re all consuming all the time. Those who get paid for this are those who are producing. And this equipment will help teach them the basics of that. If they’re capable of the basics, I think there’s a place for them in that industry.”

Read more from The Daily Star.

 

Plus, Five funky last-minute gifts for radio fanatics from Radio Survivor!

By | December 20th, 2016|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Mourning those Lost in Oakland, including College Radio Participants from KALX

I’m imaging that in the weeks to come, we’ll learn of more radio folks and I would love to hear their stories. My heart aches for the friends and families of everyone lost in the fire. If you’d like to lend support to those affected by the fire, some options are listed here. Numerous vigils and benefits have been taking place since the fire, including some upcoming events in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Read more from Radio Survivor.

Happy birthday, WPRK

This student-powered beacon is a cultural and community treasure as an expressive outlet for the area’s youth and the only radio voice for truly interesting music. That this constellation of portholes into alternative, obscure and sometimes even freaky sounds and perspectives exists amid a sea of corporate banality in terrestrial radio is laudable. That it exists here in our community is manna.

Read more from Orlando Weekly.

Simmons College Radio hosts pledge-a-thon in memory of beloved professor

“When the radio station team tried to find a way to honor Len, we kept coming back to his love of radio and education. When Julia [Taliesin] mentioned that the books for the Congo hadn’t been sent yet, radio jumped at the opportunity to help out and combine it with what we do best: broadcast,” said Danielle Annecston, the current station general manager.

Read more from The Simmons Voice.

The Revival of Griffin Radio 2016

Griffin Radio was a core council club that diminished over time. With its leading seniors graduating and the 55th Street station now being used as storage there really wasn’t any room for this club to be revived. Freshmen Marchael Giles and Emilee Wermenchuk saw the opportunity to reinstate the club and give it a new spin that would better suit the Marymount Manhattan College community.

Read more from The Monitor.

UNLV’s KUNV/Las Vegas To Remain Student-Run Independent

The school had struck a deal last year to hand over operation of the station, part of the UNLV school of journalism, to NEVADA PUBLIC RADIO, with the annual KUNV subsidy used for other educational purposes; with that deal falling through, the station will remain independent and run by a mostly student staff, and the school is hiring a new underwriting director and may expand its internship program and develop two more radio-focused classes.
Read more from All Access.

By | December 13th, 2016|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Board Blog: Hello, bonjour, and aloha

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Greetings from the new president of CBI.

johnmAs the new president of CBI, please allow me to introduce myself. I’m an instructor of Radio and TV at the University of Southern Indiana and the Faculty Advisor/General Manager of our student radio station, 95.7 Evansville’s Alternative. I’ve been at USI since 1993, but I moved into my current role in 1999. Before that as a professional, I did news, sports and sales at a variety of stations in Indiana, Idaho and Missouri. Radio was an early love of mine. I was one of those people that after visiting a radio station on a sixth grade field trip, I knew what I wanted to do professionally. There’s no doubt that I know how blessed I have been to not only work in radio, but now teach in that same field.

As my term as CBI president begins I enter this opportunity excited, but also with the knowledge that I am becoming part of a team that has done incredible work. It was just a handful of years ago that the future of this great organization was in doubt when the split with CMA/ACP happened. Not only did CBI survive, but in my opinion, it is now a stronger organization and is serving its members better than ever before.

As president, it is my goal to help build on the work that the CBI board has done. But, at the same time, I do have some ideas of how we can continue to move forward. As past-president Greg Weston said at the convention in Philadelphia, we must find a way to get more CBI members to take active roles in the organization. A great example of some already stepping up and doing this is Steven Hames who coordinates our awards competition, Election Commissioner Ed Arke, and Stephen Merrill, our convention cybercast coordinator. It those members that take active roles alongside the board that make the CBI great. Now we need to find more opportunities for those members that want to take on new challenges serving the next generation of electronic media professionals.

A final goal is one that is already a strong driving force of the CBI board, and that is to keep the National Student Electronic Media Conventions exciting, packed with great educational sessions and affordable. It’s that last part, affordability, that will continue to be our challenge as we balance that with great conference locations that are appealing to our members.

By | December 7th, 2016|Board Blogs|Comments Off on Board Blog: Hello, bonjour, and aloha