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Interested in being part of the planning discussion for NSEMC? Join the Planning Facebook Group.

For more info about joining CBI, visit the join CBI web page.

To contact us about participating in the 2016 NSEMC, visit the contact page.

Follow our Twitter @askcbi and our Facebook for more updates as they are released, and check out last year’s 2015 conference site from Minneapolis Oct. 22-24.

By | March 25th, 2016|CBI News, Conferences|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

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WKNC hosts second annual Radio Ride

WKNC 88.1 FM will host its second annual Radio Ride, an alleycat style bike ride and scavenger-hunt throughout NC State’s campus and downtown Raleigh, on Saturday, September 24 at 1 p.m.

Participants will receive a set of clues for various checkpoints and can expect to bike between 15 and 20 miles. Prizes for the top finishers include donated items from local businesses.

“I’ve ridden in several similar races over the past few years and when I chose the pit stops I made sure nothing was repeated,” said Justice Dunne, principal organizer of the event and a DJ for WKNC. “Riders can look forward to a challenge solving the clues and finding the new locations.”

Read more on the WKNC website.

Crutcher audio documentary to be part of World College Radio Day

Paul Crutcher’s audio documentary, “The Soul of College Radio,” will be part of a one-hour simulcast during World College Radio Day on Nov. 4.

On that Friday, hundreds of college radio stations will celebrate the broadcast medium. Lending star power to the day’s simulcast are Sean Lennon, Moby and Alanis Morissette.

“To do the documentary was just an idea that I had, because I love college radio,” said Crutcher, general manager of XLR Lander Radio at Lander University. “It’s been a couple of years in the making.”

Read more from the Index-Journal.

CBI announces special sessions and pre-convention sessions for2016 NSEMC

Visit the Philadelphia site for information on hotel reservations, convention registration and more.

Plus, Radio Survivor’s College Radio Watch column

By | September 20th, 2016|CBI News, Member News|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

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WKNC launches new podcast offering legal help for students

WKNC 88.1 FM recently launched the new podcast “Legal Werk,” featuring in-depth interviews with lawyers from NC State University Student Legal Services. Now in its fourth episode, the podcasts address issues commonly faced by students. Episodes are broadcast on-air, as part of the weekly public affairs program “Eye on the Triangle,” and then podcasted via iTunes. Episodes are also posted on WKNC’s SoundCloud account at http://soundcloud.com/wknc881.

Marshall University School of Journalism and Mass Communications Hall of Fame ceremony set for September 23

Five graduates of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) are being inducted into the school’s Hall of Fame later this month.

Dr. Charles G. “Chuck” Bailey, Mike Cherry, Jody Jividen, Chad Pennington and Peter Ruest will be inducted during a ceremony, which is scheduled for 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Charles Ryan Associates and Stadelman Consulting are the presenting sponsors of the ceremony. A pre-event reception is scheduled for 6 p.m. in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center.

Read more from Marshall University.

WTBU recovers from fire, resumes broadcasting

Boston University’s student-run radio station WTBU will resume broadcasting this fall, more than five months after its studio was burned in a three-alarm fire triggered by a short circuit.

The staff has put a lot of time and effort into the station’s recovery, including creating a #SaveWTBU fundraising campaign, General Manager Christie Leist wrote in an email.

Read more from The Daily Free Press.

Delta mourns loss of Public Broadcasting leader

PBS has lost one of its true champions with the passing of longtime Delta College Broadcasting leader Barry Baker. The Bay City resident, who guided the college’s public television and radio stations with a firm but fair hand for nearly 20 years, passed away on Aug. 30, 2016. He was 67.

Read more from Midland Daily News.

KCSC blows out the candles on its 65th year

Students and Chico locals gathered on the shady lawn in front of Glenn Hall on Saturday for an afternoon of good food and even better music celebrating Chico State’s student run radio station, KCSC’s 65th anniversary.

The celebration was complete with tacos, tie-dying and performances from local artists.

Read more from The Orion.

Cougar Radio Station continues to grow

“I first started working in radio my senior year of high school when I had to complete a senior project at Columbus High School and I got to work with PMB Broadcasting so, it was a very surreal experience to finally be able to put it to the test when I got here,” Holley said.

Read more from WRBL.

College-based KSDS redefines student radio

For San Diego City College students, Jazz 88.3 is also educational.

The radio station, which for the past three years was named the best in the nation by JazzWeek, originates from studios on the campus and is broadcast from a transmitter and antenna at Mesa College, also in the San Diego Community College District.

Read more from The San Diego Union-Tribune.

CBI announces special sessions and pre-convention sessions for2016 NSEMC

 

 

Visit the Philadelphia site for information on hotel reservations, convention registration and more.

Plus, Radio Survivor’s College Radio Watch column and Podcast #62.

By | September 13th, 2016|About CBI, CBI News, Member News|0 Comments

Board Blog: Making College Media More Inclusive

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Jamie Lynn Gilbert, CBI Secretary

Jamie Lynn Gilbert, CBI Secretary

Last year I made a pledge to make my college radio station a more welcoming and inclusive environment for all current and potential students. To help accomplish my goal, I enrolled in a 10-workshop training program through my school called the Equal Opportunity Institute to help develop my diversity skills. I completed a few required workshops and selected others that focused on my individual goal of using more inclusive language to recognize and respect diversity in gender identity and sexual orientation. I learned an incredible amount and want to share some tips to help make your college media outlet a more inclusive environment.

Take diversity training
Reading this list is a start, but to really increase your diversity awareness and make your college media outlet more inclusive you are going to need professional help. If your school offers a program like the Equal Opportunity Institute you should sign up for it. If not, seek out the GLBT Center, Women’s Center, Multicultural Student Affairs and other departments and see what trainings they offer. You don’t need to take all the workshops in one semester, but start identifying the workshops you might need or benefit most from and start there.

Plan diversity training for your staff
While it is important for you as a college media adviser/manager or student leader to understand diversity and inclusion, it is also important to train your staff. Plan a staff training that centers on diversity and ask representatives from campus departments to help. If those resources are more limited, the Poynter Institute’s News University offers some free and low-cost webinars on diversity issues, including Handling Race and Ethnicity and Getting Beyond Stereotypes: Better Disability Journalism. You’ll also want to share the Diversity Style Guide, a project of the Center for Integration and Improvement of Journalism at San Francisco State University.

Show your staff diversityWKNCstaffphoto
One of the best things my former boss taught me was to ensure all our marketing material represented a diverse staff. That doesn’t mean making sure the one international or disabled student on your staff is prominently featured in all your fliers, but to ensure that not all your smiling faces look the same. Take the same approach when you are staffing information tables. People will be more inclined to approach your table if they see people who look like them standing behind it.

Actively recruit diverse participants
If everyone on your staff looks the same, you have a problem. The best way to ensure diverse hiring is to have a diverse recruitment pool. Think about how you are advertising for staff recruitment events. Are you putting up some fliers and sending some tweets and that’s it? Consider sending recruitment notices to different departments that serve populations not well represented on your staff. If you wanted more journalism students you would send a notice to the journalism department so if you want more international/female/GLBT/Latinx/etc. students send a notice to the departments and other student groups that serve them. They can’t join your staff if they don’t know you are hiring.

Consider religious holidays when planning events
Most schools already accommodate for major Christian holidays Easter and Christmas, so no staff activities are likely to be scheduled then. Likewise, don’t schedule mandatory staff meetings on major Jewish holidays like Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur when some staff members may need to be with their families or at religious services. Or don’t schedule staff pizza parties during Ramadan, when Muslim students may be fasting from sunrise to sunset.

Cover non-majority groups
People sometimes complain that major news outlets don’t cover stories that appeal to minority audiences or only cover minority groups in a negative way. That doesn’t need to be the case at your college media outlet. Subscribe to as many campus departmental newsletters as you can and share information that positively portrays minority groups and their contributions on campus. Then send students out to cover their stories.

Use non-gendered language
When introducing yourself to a new group of staff members or trainees, provide your gender pronouns and ask them to do the same. This way it gets your staff to think about gender identity and provides staff who may use non-gendered pronouns like they/them/theirs a chance to share their identity once rather than individually dozens of times. Likewise, have your reporters verify gender pronouns when verifying names, titles and other information with sources.

glbtadvocateBe visible
Show your support of diversity and inclusion. Part of my pledge as a NC State GLBT Advocate is to address inappropriate comments, language, jokes and incidents I observe on campus to help maintain an inclusive and welcoming environment. Make sure your staff and visitors are aware that your college media outlet strives to be a welcoming and inclusive space and inappropriate language and behavior will not be tolerated.

 

By | September 7th, 2016|Board Blogs|1 Comment

Student Media in the News

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High School Radio Network launches Sept. 7

It’s no secret that I have a soft spot for high school radio and it’s particularly nice to hear about projects that serve to build a closer high school radio community. Ralph Martin of KVCB wrote to Radio Survivor to let us know about the launch of a high school radio network, which is appropriately named HS Radio Network, on September 7.

Read more from Radio Survivor.

Radio Recollections: The Sound of Stanford’s KZSU in the Early 50s (part 3)

In the early 1950s Stanford University’s KZSU was block programmed like most radio stations. “Cardinal Classics” with classical music was broadcast 8 to 9 PM every night. Occasionally KZSU would broadcast a one-hour radio play at 9 PM. Staff members were the actors, though sometimes speech and drama students acted.

Read more from Radio Survivor.

How ‘Popular’ is your college radio station?

Princeton Review’s annual college survey results are in, including the “Best College Radio Station” list, which year after year I critique, since the survey does not ask about the quality of a campus radio station. Based on online student surveys, the “Best College Radio Station” list is actually a list of schools that survey respondents said had “popular” radio stations. Specific radio stations are not named by Princeton Review or by students and as we’ve seen in years past, schools with multiple radio stations are often more likely to be perceived as having “popular” radio stations.

Read more from Radio Survivor.

‘Pitch Perfect’ completely nailed the college radio experience

From the first moments that Becca (Anna Kendrick) walks into the station, I could SMELL those old records through the screen. If you’ve ever stepped foot in a college radio station’s library, well, that’s a smell that doesn’t leave your nose. It’s musty and exciting in a way very few similar scents can be.

Read more from Decider.

CBI announces Keynote, awards finalists and emcee for 2016 NSEMC

Finalists in the CBI National Student Production Awards have been announced in 24 categories on the CBI Philadelphia website. Winners will be announced at the annual National Student Electronic Media Convention in Philadelphia on Saturday, Oct. 22, directly following the keynote address by Glenn Schuck. The awards will be emceed by local TV anchor Lucy Noland.

Visit the Philadelphia site for information on hotel reservations, convention registration and more.

Plus, Radio Survivor’s College Radio Watch column and Podcast #61, and the latest on CMJ from Radio Survivor, Stereogum and NYSMusic.

By | September 6th, 2016|CBI News, Conventions, Member News|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

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How Columbus State University got a radio station

Danna Gibson and Scott Sellnow-Richmond have each played a vital role in launching Columbus State University’s new WCUG radio station.

A year later, WCUG has grown and surpassed all of its goals. Both professors sat down with reporter Carrie Beth Wallace to discuss the process of obtaining WCUG, how it’s grown over the past year and where the station is headed.

Read more from the Ledger-Enquirer.

In a First, Blind High School Student Is Matanzas-FPC Football Game’s Radio Commentator

Trent Ferguson is 18 years old. He plays drums in a rock band with some friends from school. He’s got his own podcast.  And he wants to be a professional sports broadcaster when he grows up.

None of this sounds different from thousands of other high school seniors in America right now. Except Trent is quite a bit different from all those other aspirants who can at least see a Norman Rockwell if it’s pointed out to them. He’s been completely blind since birth. He has never seen a thing, at least not the way most of us understand seeing. But he’s about the most optimistic, chipper person you’ll talk to, and his disability might as well be the spotter to his sense of humor.

Read more from FlaglerLive.com.

Is CMJ happening this year? Probably not

As the annual time for CMJ’s lineup announcement approaches, several industry sources tell Pitchfork that it isn’t taking place at all in 2016. The CMJ website also hasn’t been updated in months.

However, in reply to a question from Pitchfork, the operator of CMJ’s Facebook account wrote today: “As crazy as it seems, as of now, our CEO, Adam Klein, still says it’s happening. You now have all the info I do.”

Read more from Yahoo, plus another article on CMJ from Stereogum.

CBI announces Keynote, awards finalists and emcee for 2016 NSEMC

Finalists in the CBI National Student Production Awards have been announced in 24 categories on the CBI Philadelphia website. Winners will be announced at the annual National Student Electronic Media Convention in Philadelphia on Saturday, Oct. 22, directly following the keynote address by Glenn Schuck. The awards will be emceed by local TV anchor Lucy Noland.

Visit the Philadelphia site for information on hotel reservations, convention registration and more.

Plus, Radio Survivor’s College Radio Watch column and Radio World’s Campus View.

By | August 30th, 2016|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Conventions, Member News|0 Comments

Veteran News Reporter Glenn Schuck to Deliver Keynote at 2016 NSEMC

College Broadcasters, Inc. (CBI) announces long-time New York City radio reporter and anchor Glenn Schuck as keynote speaker for the 5th annual National Student Electronic Media Convention (NSEMC) on Saturday, Oct. 22 in Philadelphia.

Glen2A broadcaster for more than 30 years and presently with America’s most listened-to radio station, 1010 WINS, Schuck will share his insights on the media’s coverage of the 2016 Presidential campaign and the evolving role of journalists in the 21st century media landscape. He will also reflect on key decisions and networking that allowed his career to evolve and review ways today’s students can pave the way for their careers.

A native of New Jersey, Schuck began his professional radio career as a DJ for stations WJRZ/Jersey Shore, WPST/Trenton, legendary rocker WAAF/Boston and as morning host at KROCK/Los Angeles.  In 1995, Schuck began anchoring business reports for CNBC. In 1997 he left CNBC for Metro Networks, at that time a new radio news wire service.  In 2000, Glenn joined New York’s number one news station 1010 WINS as a reporter, while also being named News Director for Metro Networks. He left his role at Metro Networks in 2013 to join CBS Radio fulltime, adding anchor duties to his reporting responsibilities at 1010 WINS.

Schuck was the first radio reporter to inspect Ground Zero with Mayor Rudy Giuliani the morning of September 12, 2001. Schuck’s months-long reporting on the aftermath of the 9/11 earned him critical acclaim.  He contributed to both an HBO documentary and two books about the terror attacks on the World Trade Center.  For the past 16 years, Schuck has covered nearly every major news event in the New York metropolitan area, from Papal visits and Super Storm Sandy, blackouts and shootings, to “Bridgegate” and Super Bowl and World Series appearances by New York teams.  He has appeared on many TV programs to discuss issues in the news, including CNN, MSNBC, and NY1, and has been sent on assignment to Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, San Francisco, Boston, and other cities.  Schuck has won many awards for his work from the Associated Press, the New York Press Club, and the NY AIR Awards.  He served as President of the New York Press Club from 2009-2012.

Schuck got his start in student-run media, joining the staff of Seton Hall University’s WSOU in 1981.  During his time at the WSOU he was news director and then station manager, experience he credits for the launch of his successful media career.

The 2016 NSEMC will be held at the Sonesta Downtown Philadelphia Hotel, Oct. 20-22, with three days of programming and interactive sessions led by broadcast professionals, student media advisers and students from college media outlets all over the country. The convention also features intensive pre-convention workshops, including a MusicMaster Genius Day, and the presentation of the National Student Production Awards winners on Oct. 22.

By | August 24th, 2016|CBI News, Conventions|1 Comment

Student Media in the News

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Is College Radio Relevant?
Despite the rise of popular broadcasts ranging from sportscasts to music countdowns, radio has generally been on the decline. We have turned the dial to its off position and turned on our smartphones, abundant with news, traffic reports, YouTube, and pretty much everything the radio can give us without commercial breaks. Yet, mainstream radio largely remains a stable part of society, especially for when we cannot reach our phones, such as during rush-hour traffic on the Long Island Expressway or spontaneous weekends to the Poconos. But how does college radio fit into the equation?
Read more from Oxford University Press.

Illinois Campus Radio Station Seeks Faculty and Staff DJs

As part of its ongoing efforts to facilitate lasting radio shows hosted by affiliates of Illinois Institute of Technology, WIIT 88.9FM Chicago is offering open slots to any Illinois Tech faculty or staff member who wishes to share their taste in music, their thoughts on current events, or any other concept on the airwaves of Chicago and worldwide on its online stream.

Read more from IIT.edu.

Eternal Summers, New Salem Witch Hunters headline WRUW-FM 91.1’s annual Studio-A-Rama music festival

Studio-A-Rama, the annual free all-day festival hosted by Case Western Reserve University’s campus radio station WRUW-FM 91.1, returns on Sept. 10 with Virginia indie-pop group Eternal Summers headlining. Cleveland alt-rock legends New Salem Witch Hunters are the special guest.

Held in the Mather Courtyard of Case Western, Studio-A-Rama has been a summer music highlight since 1981. Kicking off at 1:15 p.m., the fest invites concert-goers to sprawl out on the green lawn under the sun. If you can’t make it, the festival will again be live streaming the entire show over the station’s airwaves and on YouTube.

Read more from Cleveland.com.

‘Good’ times continue for KTCU radio hosts

The high sheriffs of DFW.com called me back in 2010 and insisted I go down to KTCU/88.7 FM for something called The Good Show, a music program on a college radio station run by people who aren’t attending that college. It has been on the air continuously (give or take a few weeks) since before the turn of the last century.

Read more from the Star-Telegram.

CBI announces National Student Production Awards finalists

Finalists in the 2016 CBI National Student Production Awards are being announced here on the CBI blog, and also our Twitter and Facebook pages, Aug. 15-19 and 22-26! Winners will be announced at the annual National Student Electronic Media Convention in Philadelphia this fall.

Visit the Philadelphia site for information on hotel reservations, convention registration and more.

Plus, Radio Survivor checks out National Radio Day.

 

By | August 23rd, 2016|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Contests, Conventions, Member News|0 Comments

EAS Test Reporting System deadlines

FCC Licensed Stations MUST Participate by August 26, 2016

The FCC has established the EAS Test Reporting System (ETRS) as a means to improve the EAS system for national emergencies.  There are important deadlines you need to be aware of concerning this change.

  • Form One must be filed on or before August 26, 2016.
  • Form One filings may be edited until September 26, 2016.
  • Form Two must be filed on or before 11:59 pm EDT on September 28, 2016.
  • Form Three must be filed on or before November 14, 2016.

Forms Two and Three will be available at 2:20 pm EDT on September 28, 2016.

Note that form two must be filed between 2:20 pm (EDT) and 11:59 pm (EDT) on September 28, 2016 (which is a Wednesday).   More information about ETRS is available at https://www.fcc.gov/general/eas-test-reporting-system which includes a link to recorded webinar on the topic.

If you need help with this topic, email ETRS@fcc.gov.

 

By | August 19th, 2016|Broadcasting News, CBI News, FCC|0 Comments

National Student Production Awards finalists

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We’re announcing the 2016 finalists in CBI’s National Student Production Awards over on the Philadelphia website! We’ll be posting new categories every weekday until Friday, Aug. 26, so check back.

While you’re there, see all the latest on the National Student Electronic Media Convention, Oct. 20-22. We’re posting info on the hotel, special pre-convention workshops and more.

By | August 16th, 2016|CBI News, Conferences, Conventions|0 Comments

Board Blog: Is it still 2002 on your website?

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Jessica Clary, CBI IT Content Director

Jessica Clary, CBI IT Content Director

Remember early 1990s websites? Hosted on Geocities or Tripod. Heavy on the animated flames and a funny cartoon of a road worker that says “Under Construction.” A hit counter, with an animated globe showing where visitors are coming from. Maybe even that dancing baby from TV. Ah, the simple times.

Plenty of these design elements made their way to the first social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook, but it’s 2016, and your website needs to be a streamlined, easy-to-navigate ultimate source for your readers, listeners, viewers — for anyone interested. It’s time to drop the outdated and cheesy, and time to give visitors quick and easy access to what they came for.

Here are some things have, and some things to definitely get rid of:

Things to have

  • An easy-to-find “About” page, with things like hours, location, contact information, etc.
  • Fresh content. This can be blogs, news, links, playlist posts, anything, just make sure when someone visits your site, they aren’t seeing the last update was done two years ago.
  • A responsive design for mobile and tablet. Take a look at your analytics page and see how many of your visitors are seeing your page on their phone or tablet. Now, how does your page look and work for them? Remember, things that were fun on your desktop 10 years ago (big Flash animations, music, funny cursors, etc.) don’t work on phones.
  • Social media links. If you have them, don’t be shy about them. But, if you advertise them, make sure they’re current. Don’t send a user to a Twitter that hasn’t been updated in three months.
  • Content hierarchy. Make it easy to see from the front page what’s new, what’s important, what the visitor shouldn’t miss.
  • Calendars, schedules, even a countdown widget is appropriate if you’re gearing up for a big event.
  • Blogs, staff bios and personal touches.

Things you can lose

  • Out-of-style widgets and design elements: tag clouds, Flash animations, anything that requires special plug-ins, anything auto-play, big carousel sliders, splash landing pages. Bevel and emboss text effects, Comic Sans, word art. If you had it on your MySpace, it’s time to let it go.

Glitter Words

  • Heavy images. Especially when you’re being mindful of your users’ time and data plans, don’t make them load a lot of extra stuff just to find your address or hours.
  • Stock photos. Your site should highlight the uniqueness of your media group as only you can. Why use a stock photo when you can snap a high-quality unique image of your actual office, staff or studio?
  • Infinite scrolling. Don’t make it harder for people to find the information they’re looking for.
  • Pop-ups. Even if they’re your own. If people want to sign up for your newsletter, don’t annoy them with a pop-up begging them to do so.

Your website should be unique to your media group and audience, but easy and welcoming to a first-time visitor. Make your content so good people don’t wonder where the dancing baby went. Striking that balance, and getting rid of outdated and annoying features, will freshen up your site for everyone.

Ready to see the best of student media websites in the CBI National Student Production Awards finalists, and finalists in all the other 23 categories, starting next week right here on the CBI website!

By | August 10th, 2016|Board Blogs|0 Comments