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Student Media in the News

The Debate Over RIPR’s Expansion

Earlier this year, Rhode Island Public Radio went public with a proposed plan to acquire UMass Dartmouth’s 45-year-old college radio station, 89.3 WUMD. Rhode Island Public Radio, still a relatively young station currently renting small public access frequencies to air both locally produced news features as well as NPR programming such as All Things Considered and Fresh Air, wants a permanent home and for them WUMD fits the bill. It’s a powerful signal from which they could grow locally produced journalism on a solid, owned foundation that would be moved just over state lines to Tiverton; covering Rhode Island, all of the South Coast to Cape Cod and even some parts of eastern Connecticut. All the deal needs is FCC approval, but standing in the way is the community and student staff at WUMD.

Read more from Providence Monthly.

KCSM to remain despite ongoing budget struggle: College official claims recent turnover not indicative of larger coming shifts

Despite experiencing the sort of ongoing financial budget strife commonly faced by college radio stations, faithful listeners to KCSM can expect most of their favorite programming to remain, a district official said.

The College of San Mateo’s jazz radio station, 91.1 FM, lost three on-air personalities in recent months, but such changes are not indicative of larger shifts on the horizon, said Mitchell Bailey, spokesman for the San Mateo County Community College District.

Read more from The Daily Journal.

Miss. College Sells FM License in Jackson

Mississippi College is selling its FM signal at 93.5 MHz in Jackson.

“Star 93.5” WHJT(FM) is an outreach ministry of the college; it has aired heritage Christian music for the central part of the state since 1989; members of the station are shown in a 2014 image from its website.

Read more from Radio World.

Lake Land College invites students to the Radio/TV Open House

During the Radio/TV Open House from 12-2 p.m., participants are invited to broadcast LIVE on WLKL 89.9 The Max Alternative, the college’s student run FM radio station; anchor a newscast in the TV studio; use equipment in the TV production control room and studio; record and listen to their own audio spot using professional audio equipment; operate state-of-the-art camera and video equipment and experiment with industry-standard digital editing software.

Read more from the Effingham Daily News.

Hendrix Radio Station KHDX Part of New Arkansas College Radio Association

“One of our hopes is that the ArkCRA will help provide stability and support to student-run radio operations, which can struggle sometimes because of staff turnover,” said Hendrix biology professor and KHDX advisor Dr. Maureen McClung. “Charter stations include well-established organizations and those that are just starting out, so the ArkCRA presents many opportunities for collaboration.”

Read more from Hendrix College.

Plus, How to Improve your LPFM Community & College Radio Reception on Radio Survivor.

By | March 21st, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

College Radio Day set for Oct. 6

We were delighted to set a new record for college radio registrations in a single day when we opened up registration for College Radio Day 2017 on Friday. Over 40 stations registered in one day.

We are also still very excited about our upcoming Vinylthon next month. Stations can register for it here.

Read more from College Radio Day.

Pickering College radio station to broadcast Aurora events, town news

Pickering College is looking to partner with Aurora to highlight what’s going on the community.

Students recently made a presentation to council about the school’s radio station, 102.7 CHOP FM.

Read more from YorkRegion.com.

10 things you didn’t know about Chapman Radio and its 50th anniversary

Chapman Radio’s original call sign was KNAC – “The Station With the KNAC” and was broadcasted out of Morlan Hall. A few decades later, the organization changed its call sign to KNAB – “The Station With the KNAB.”

Read more from The Panther.

Plus, Radio Survivor visits WYBF at Cabrini University and the College Radio Watch Column.

By | March 14th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

WBRU radio station may be going up for sale soon

WBRU-FM may be for sale in the near future.In a letter sent to WBRU alumni Thursday morning, general manager and Brown University student Kishanee Haththotuwegama said the station’s nine-member board of directors had passed a resolution to begin seeking a buyer. The Station Membership, which consists of about 50 Brown University students who work at the station, will vote March 11 on approving a possible sale.
Read more from Providence Journal.

96.3 KNDS Put on Probation, at Risk of Losing NDSU Funding

For some of us, music is what gets us through our longest days.Yet, listening to 96.3 FM KNDS, NDSU’s student-run radio station, is not the route students choose to go to for their wind down of tunes.“I honestly think a lot of people haven’t heard as much of us as we would like to,” said KNDS’ Assistant Station Manager Brian Jackson.
Read more from KVVR.com.

SF school leaders attempt to steer news coverage of district-owned KALW

A top education official suggested that KALW public radio cover positive news about the San Francisco Unified School District on Tuesday, appearing to encroach on the editorial independence of the school district-owned radio station.
Read more from the San Francisco Examiner.

WCBN: Your Source for Musical Connections

On college campuses across the country, radio has largely been replaced by online music curation services like Pandora. While these services are convenient and are likely to connect us to music that we will like, they rarely introduce new themes or genres.  College radio stations such as WCBN at the University of Michigan, however, specialize in this. These stations offer students, and the community that they broadcast to, endless programing of new and underrepresented music while also offering students the opportunity to develop their knowledge of music as DJs.
Read more from The Michigan Review.

How San Bernardino Community College District is about to make $157 million off KVCR

The San Bernardino Community College District, which runs KVCR-TV, is expected to receive $157,113,171 in return for its broadcast frequency, the district announced Monday. Its programming will still be available, and viewers are not likely to notice a change.The district, which includes San Bernardino Valley College and Crafton Hills College, voluntarily participated in a Federal Communications Commission auction to free up bandwidth. Once vacated by KVCR, that bandwidth will be used by mobile and wireless providers.
Read more from the San Bernardino Sun.

By | March 7th, 2017|About CBI, Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

CBI election nomination period extended

College Broadcasters, Inc. (CBI) is now accepting nominations through Monday, March 6 for the offices of Secretary, Development Director and Student Member. The Secretary and Development Director are each 3-year terms beginning December 1, 2017. The Student Member is a one year term beginning May 1, 2017. To be considered, nominations must be received by Ed Arke (earke@messiah.edu), Election Commissioner (self-nominations are accepted).

Read more from the CBI website.

SU Radio to return to air

This weekend, I conducted an interview with First-Year Meredith Rasmussen. She learned that the station had been abandoned last year due to declining membership. The radio station started in 2008 when a group of students received the King Creativity Grant to create an internet radio station. Since then, its popularity among membership and listeners has fluctuated until January 2016 when it was basically abandoned. Since then, no one has worked on the station and it just disappeared. So she took it upon herself to change its fate.

“Restarting the radio station was something that I had been wanting to do basically since arriving on campus,” Rasmussen said. “College radio was something that I have been interested in, and I was really disappointed that we didn’t have a station.”

Read more from The Megaphone.

EC Radio is back after extended hiatus

The wait is over. Emmanuel College Radio plans to officially launch their reboot this semester. The revival of EC Radio began with current president Nana Addae ’19 and vice president Jill Hyburg ’19. Before them, EC Radio club was dormant for two years.

Read more from The Hub.

Drury radio station carving out its place on FM dial

Drury University has long been home to an internet-based radio station that was broadcast, through a complicated antenna system, in various campus buildings.

The reach and the impact were severely limited, however. Jonathan Groves, chair of the communications department, believed the student-run college radio station could be so much more if it were available on the FM dial.

Read more from the Springfield News-Leader.

Project Yellow Light seeks PSAs for scholarship competition

Project Yellow Light is a scholarship competition designed to bring change. Applicants have the mission to create a radio spot to encourage their peers to avoid distracted driving, specifically, texting while driving. Application deadline is April 1.  There are two scholarships (one for college and one for high school) worth $2,000 each. In addition to winning a scholarship, the winning entries will be turned into an Ad Council PSA and aired across the country courtesy of iHeartRadio. More info about PYL is here: http://www.projectyellowlight.com/about, and application guidelines for the contest are here: http://www.projectyellowlight.com/apply#radio.

Plus, the latest College Radio Watch column and Podcast #82: Busting Myths and Counting Charts.

By | February 28th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

Another College Station Sold

Cincinnati.com reported that supporters of the station showed up to a special regents meeting Tuesday to try to save the station. Many left in tears. Cincymusic.com’s Ian Bolender said, “You’re not just selling a radio station, you’re selling off the well-being of our music community. Without WNKU, a lot of artists would’ve never broke in this market.”

Read more at Radio Ink.

Fate of College Radio Charts Uncertain at CMJ After Almost 40 Years

One of the remaining bastions of the college-rock era has fallen silent, at least for now. For the second week in a row, CMJ has not published its weekly college radio charts, calling into question the fate of an institution that has tracked the music played by college stations around the country since 1978. No date has been set for when the venerable—and, once, invaluable—charts will resume.

Read more from Pitchfork.

SA approves WQKE radio funding

The President of WQKE Natalie Gramegna presented her appeal before the Senate for the allocation of $9846.27 for the purposes of purchasing updated equipment. The Senate voted in favor of Gramegna’s proposal allowing for the acquisition of various technical equipment necessary for the functioning the WQKE’s radio broadcast. The funds requested will be provided on behalf of the SA’s stabilization fund.

Read more from Cardinal Points.

Prairie Public radio to end broadcasts from UND

UND is preparing to sell its long-held radio station licenses to Prairie Public Radio as it readies plans to tear down the building which houses the local studio.

Bill Thomas, director of Prairie Public Radio, said the public radio service is currently in talks with the university about transferring the licensing for its two stations, KFJM and KUND-FM, to the main network. Thomas said local production would relocate from Grand Forks to the main Prairie Public offices in Fargo, though he said viewers “won’t be able to tell any difference on the air.”

Read more from Grand Forks Herald.

 

Plus, College Radio Watch weighs in on CMJ, the 81st Radio Survivor Podcast and Bandcamp Weekly checks out KPSU.

By | February 21st, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Syracuse radio station returning to airwaves for first time in 6 years

WERW, a student-run station at Syracuse University, announced Friday that it would soon begin broadcasting on the AM dial again. The college radio broadcaster had been operating online only since 2011, when a transmitter was removed from Booth Hall on campus.

The new signal will debut Monday, Feb. 20 on 1670 AM from antennas on top of the Carrier Dome and SU’s Goldstein Student Center on the South Campus, according to WERW general manager Rebecca Duke. However, the station will only broadcast at 100 mW (milliwatts) — a much lower power than WERW’s past signal of 20 watts in the ’90s and 2000s.

Read more from Syracuse.com.

Pitchfork wonders, ‘Does college radio even matter anymore?’

Yet, these experiences run the risk of becoming scarce, as more and more college stations go silent or cede their broadcast towers to corporate interests and conglomerates. Adding to the alarm is the recent downfall of CMJ, the institution that for decades tied the nation’s college radio stations together through charts and its annual festival. All this bad news has led some to eulogize the format, but college radio is still alive and, for many, still necessary.

Read more from Pitchfork.

On Air Next tackles the Pitchfork article

On Wednesday, Pitchfork posted an article titled “Does College Radio Even Matter Anymore.” If you haven’t read it yet, Kevin Lozano walks through the ins and outs of college radio history and finally decides: Yes, there is still a place for college radio. Of course, we at Radio 1190 knew this all along. Radio 1190 gives us an independent voice to express what we love, how we think and what we’re excited about. There’s so much content being created today — more than ever before. Staying on top of everything is an immeasurable challenge; one that no one is able to do alone.

Read more from Colorado Daily.

‘Stretch and Bobbito: Radio That Changed Lives’ Chronicles Legendary Hip Hop Radio Show

Stretch and Bobbito: Radio That Changed Lives is one of those little stories that had a huge impact. The 2015 movie is currently available for streaming on Netflix and chronicles The Stretch Armstrong and Bobbito Show, a New York-based college radio program whose influence travelled farther than its weak FM signal should have allowed. It had a religiously dedicated fanbase, and from 1990 to 1998 played host to just about every East Coast rapper of note before they hit it big. Perhaps more importantly, they cultivated an aesthetic appreciation of hip hop that would inspire underground hip hop for years to come. Hip hop authority The Source magazine went so for as to name it the “Best Hip Hop Radio Show of All Time.”

Read more from Decider.

Plus, Radio Survivor explores college stations for World Radio Day, checks archives from WQAX in 1981 and the College Radio Watch column.

By | February 14th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Radio station KSVR works to serve Spanish-speaking audience

Seated in a studio at KSVR 91.7 FM last week, Francisco Farias pulled off his headphones as he took a break from recording his weekly Spanish-language music and news radio show.

Farias, who started volunteering at the station a few months ago, believes the station’s Spanish-language programs have a big impact on Skagit County’s Latino community.

“For me, this is a great opportunity to help people who don’t speak English listen to the radio and hear news,” Farias said through an interpreter. “For me, a person who doesn’t understand too much English, there are a lot of people who listen to the station.”

Read more from GoSkagit.com.

The Bronc is first to broadcast live from Philadelphia Auto Show

107.7 The Bronc became the first college radio station to broadcast live at the Philadelphia Auto Show on Sunday, Jan. 29. The Bronc brought a team of students to the show to broadcast live from noon to 4 p.m. and promote the fifth largest auto show in the nation on social media.

More than 700 vehicles were on display on the 700,000 square foot display floor in the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The auto show staff contributed more than 30,000 on-site hours of labor setting up and removing displays.

Read more from Rider University.

The Sound of Emory: An Insight into WMRE

WMRE is Emory’s only radio station. Beginning as a mere idea in the early 1980s, in 1989 the station broadcasted its first show across campus through 590AM. Clear sounds didn’t last long on the AM channel, forcing the station to shift to a cable signal and then the internet, where it can be heard today. The shift in broadcasting also helped the clubs’s shift in production, and in 2008 they moved from the basement of a now-demolished Longstreet Hall to its current studio on the fifth floor of the Dobbs University Center (DUC).

Read more from The Emory Wheel.

WRUR delivers diversity in student taste and talent

Descending into the basement of Todd Union doesn’t feel how you might imagine walking into a radio station feels.

WRUR, residing in what were once the kitchen facilities for an ancient campus dining hall, puts students the push of a button away from an invisible audience of hundreds or thousands.

Hosting shows on both WRUR’s internet and FM platforms (The Sting and 88.5, respectively), student DJ’s dig into a wide variety of musical genres on their weekly broadcasts. The ease of access that WRUR offers leads to a high volume of DJs—about forty on The Sting and ten on FM—with all different tastes and musical perspectives

Read more from The Campus Times.

Campus radio station prepares for another big semester

A new semester means fresh ideas, new people and an updated schedule for student organizations. DJs at WGLZ, West Liberty’s radio station, are not wasting their time and have lined up some events for the campus community.

The station is bringing back some successful events and promotions from previous years.

“WGLZ listeners from last year may remember the WGLZ Bracket Contest for March Madness basketball.  The contest was popular among listeners with over 200 student entries competing for some really great prizes from Coca-Cola. This promotion will be back this semester,” said Jeff Pfister, director of WGLZ.

Read more from The Trumpet.

Plus, Radio Survivor visits new LPFM KPSQ-LP in Fayetteville and KUOZ-LP at University of the Ozarks and the College Radio Watch column

By | February 7th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Tune in to 90.7 WCLH for the station’s 45 birthday

“One the biggest highlights for WCLH has been the ability to keep our equipment and software current to reflect what’s being used at commercial radio stations,” Kristen Rock, station manager said. “From vinyl to cart machines to compact discs and MP3’s, WCLH has been able to provide students with quality hands-on training while giving listeners great programming.”

In honor of the anniversary of the radio station, WCLH will be airing a five-hour pre-recorded show beginning at noon on Feb. 4.

Read more from The Beacon.

Student radio station rocks with vinyl at record show

From punk rock to doo-wop, vinyl has brought the groove to a record show that helps Plymouth-Canton student radio station WSDP-FM (88.1) raise money and stay on the air.

Record dealer Rod Branham alone plans to bring about 4,500 vinyl albums to the ninth annual record show, set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, inside the Salem High School cafeteria in Canton.

Read more from hometownlife.com.

Plus, the Radio Survivor College Radio Watch column.

By | January 31st, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Community Broadcaster: The Selling of a College Radio Station

Community radio advocates were upset when the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth announced plans to sell its WUMD(FM) signal space to Rhode Island Public Radio. This was not new as several college stations over the last few years have been sold. Those passionate about community radio often ask how they can fight back against these trends.

Read more from Radio World.

Student-Owned WUVA, Inc. Sells FM Radio License to Endow WUVANews.com Video and Print News Enterprise

After operating a Charlottesville radio station for 70 years, including 37 years as a commercial FM station, today the University of Virginia student-owned media organization, WUVA, Inc., announced that it has agreed to sell its radio station  WUVA-FM 92.7 to Saga Communications, Inc. (NYSE – MKT: SGA).

Read more from Charlottesville Tomorrow.

Plus, Spinning Indie visits KCHUNG in Los Angeles, and the 77th Podcast episode.

By | January 24th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Proposed WUMD sale hits sour note with volunteers and listeners

Unhappy DJs, station volunteers and listeners are speaking out on social media after word of the proposed $1.5 million sale of WUMD 89.3 FM to Rhode Island Public Radio.

A move to save the station, which marks its 45th anniversary Friday, has also sparked the creation of a SAVEWUMD Facebook page.

 “This (WUMD) is what keeps me going,” said Toni Pennacchia, a radio volunteer since 1996 and a former UMass Dartmouth student, who produces a weekly program called “Spoiler Alert.”

Read more from South Coast Today.

Battle Emerges Over RI Public Radio Acquiring UMass Dartmouth Radio Station

WUMD staff and supporters, however, have organized to try to stop the acquisition, citing the diminishment of local radio in the south coast of Massachusetts.

“They’re hurting southeast Massachusetts, where WUMD’s programs have been heard,” said Toni Marie Pennacchia, who disc jockeys for WUMD. “We’ve been around 45 years this Friday, I’ve been a volunteer since 1996.”

Read more from GoLocalProv.com.

Plus, more on the sale from Radio Survivor and Providence Journal.

Helena, MT Noncommercial FM Construction Permit Donated To Montana State University

Last Chance Public Radio Association is donating the construction permit for a new noncommercial FM in Helena, Mont. to Montana State University – Billings (Yellowstone Public Radio) in a deal conditioned on YPR concurrently swapping KYPH/East Helena, Mont. to the Board of Regents of Montana University System in exchange for K251AC/Helena.

Read more from AllAccess.com.

Student Broadcasters Mingle in the City of Brotherly Love

Podcasting, social media, ’zines, LPFM, the FCC and journalism were among the topics tackled at College Broadcasters Inc.’s fifth annual National Student Electronic Media Convention. Held in Philadelphia in October, the event drew a crowd of some 420 paid attendees in addition to guest speakers and sponsors.

Read more from Radio World.

 

Plus, hear how Clemson’s game-winning touchdown sounded on the radio and the latest College Radio Watch column.

By | January 17th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News