Weekly Showcase

Station Spotlight: Foothill College’s KFJC

Special thanks to Doc Pelzel, KFJC’s Station Supervisor, Cadillac Margarita, Assistant Promotions Director and Lord Gravestench, host of “Extinction Mass” for answering the questions!

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
Doc Pelzel: KFJC started in 1959 with pretty limited resources — few daily broadcast hours, low power, miniscule music library, and a skeleton staff.  As all aspects of the station developed, the most pronounced growth was in KFJC’s image for creative programming.  From the “Maximum Louie Louie” 63-hour marathon featuring 825 different versions of the same song, through the station’s annual “Month of Mayhem” barrage of special programming containing multi-hour showcases of specific bands, labels, scenes, genres, time periods or some other sonically-themed concept, to its more than 200 remote or in-studio live music broadcasts every year, KFJC has become known as a hotbed of the unusual.

What sets your station apart from other college radio stations?
Cadillac Margarita: I honestly don’t know that much about other stations, but one of the things I really like, that I believe may be different from other college stations, is the length of our individual programs. We have 3-4 hour shifts. I feel this allows the DJ on air and their audience to develop a special rapport. The DJ is given the time to hit their stride and magical things happen :)

Why did you choose to work at the radio station?
Cadillac Margarita: I wanted to learn about radio broadcasting specifically, and Foothill College had a Radio Broadcasting Program at the time. I had never listened to KFJC before I joined, so I had no expectations. Becoming as involved as I did came as a great surprise! Fun things happen when you open yourself […]

Station Spotlight: University of Minnesota’s Radio K

Thanks to Jenny Ackerson, program director, for answering the questions.

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
Radio K was born in 1993, growing out of duct-taped together (but still completely perfect) WMMR with its legacy 770 AM signal. Today we sit (completely student run) with over 60 DJs, 300 volunteers, and ever growing ambition and hold on the Twin Cities.

Radio transmissions at the University of Minnesota date to 1912.  The station is the 10th oldest station still on the air, beating out WHA at the University of Wisconsin Madison by a few hours. That also makes Radio K, KUOM,  the oldest licensed non-commercial broadcast station in the country.

What sets your station apart from other college radio stations?
Unlike many other stations, Radio K has the good blessing of having AM & FM signals, smartphone app, and an internet stream.  This helps us have a much broader dedicated fan base. We also have hundreds of in-studio sessions each year from local and national acts.

Why did you choose to work at the radio station?
I chose to work at Radio K because it is the place where I feel most comfortable, and more importantly it’s a place I found to dedicate myself to. It’s hard to find a place to work with your peers and create a really, really great product.

What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever done for your station?
The craziest thing I’ve got to do for Radio K is (aside from DJing every Thanksgiving and Christmas for the past 3 years) would be the numerous escapades in our K suit (our mascot) — going to baseball games (and throwing out the first pitch even though the K doesn’t have arms!), […]

Station Spotlight: Case Western Reserve University’s WRUW

Special thanks to station general manager Bethany Kaufman for answering the questions!

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
WRUW is the college station of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. WRUW has its roots with the Flora Stone Mather College for women. It began as WFSM, “broadcasting” via a public address system in 1946. In 1955, WFSM evolved into WRAR, an AM carrier-current station. WRAR became WRUW FM 91.1 on February 22, 1967! Initially, WRUW was a 10-watt mono station broadcasting only to the University Circle neighborhood of Cleveland. Since then, it has grown to 15,000 watts and broadcasts in stereo. It can be heard across most of northern Ohio, from the Pennsylvania border to parts of Michigan and even north into Canada. We can also be heard worldwide via our internet stream at wruw.org!

WRUW has a live programmer broadcasting 24/7. We offer over 90 shows per semester ranging from jazz, funk, rock, and even polka music to public affairs and talk.

 

What sets your station apart from other college radio stations?
Both our entirely freeform format and community member involvement set WRUW apart from other college radio stations. WRUW is purely an extracurricular activity for students; we are not affiliated with any academic department of Case Western Reserve University. Programmers have the freedom to broadcast nearly any material they would like within FCC regulations. In addition to our student programmers, we have many community member programmers as well. Some of them are Case graduates who have stayed in the area and stuck around the station. Some have no affiliation with Case outside of WRUW. Some have been with the station for decades! Our eclectic group of programmers […]

Station Spotlight: University of Minnesota, Morris’s KUMM-FM

Special thanks to Taylor Robert Barker, general manager of KUMM-FM Radio for answering the questions!

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now.
We got our start in the late 1960′s when students from the University of Minnesota, Morris would produce a weekly program for the local commercial station. KUMM, as its own independent station, went on the air in September 1972 with a mighty ten watt output, broadcasting from a couple of closets in a campus dorm. By the 1980′s, we initiated the first of our power increases, jumping to 225 watts. At the same time, we converted to stereo and moved to our current location in the Student Center. In the 2000′s, we launched our tower relocation project, transferring our antenna from the top of the campus library to its present location atop the local water tower. Our authorized power levels increased yet again to 700 watts, allowing the surrounding underserved communities to enjoy our alternative programming. During those times, and ever since, we’ve been blessed with a student body that supports our technological investments, and we’ve had the chance to give back to the industry by serving as the Minnesota headquarters of College Radio Day.

What sets your station apart from other college radio stations?
One major difference is the unusual, but playful nature of our call letters, which has been a rich source of pride and tradition since our founding. We also get an extraordinary level of support that we get from other members of the noncommercial broadcasting world. KUMM has been a long-time member of Ampers, a network of fifteen independent public radio stations throughout Minnesota. Ampers, as an organization, is committed to furthering community-oriented programming, broader […]

Station Spotlight: Elon University’s ESTV

Special thanks to Matt Lee for answering the questions!

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
Elon Student Television was started in 1992 by a former student named Christopher Waters.  Every year since then the station has grown and as of now, we have 272 people working across six shows.  Many of our shows have won national awards and recognitions, including Emmys and other Communications Honors.  In 2009, One-on-One Sports accepted the University’s first College Television Award from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Foundations.  In 2001, Phoenix14News (now Elon Local News) won 1st place in the College Television Awards newscast competition in Los Angeles.

What sets your station apart from other college TV stations?
We have six different shows, while many other college TV stations don’t have that many.  We cover news, entertainment and comedy and do it in a timely manner.  Even if we are scheduled to work with one specific show, we all help each other out if needed.  Our faculty advisers always have our back and have helped us pave a path to follow in order to continuously thrive and grow as a student-run television station.  We all have bright personalities and are eager to learn more about the field of television which is shown in each of our shows.

Why did you choose to work at the TV station?
I chose to work at this TV station because it is a great way for students to get involved in a professional type TV station. The opportunities to get hands-on experience working for programs from game shows, comedy, talk and news programs is a great way to get a feel of what interests you. Since my first year, […]

Station Spotlight: Seton Hall University’s WSOU

Thanks to Erin O’Grady and Aly Mulligan for answering the questions!

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
WSOU 89.5 FM is located in New Jersey on the campus of Seton Hall University and has been on the airwaves since 1948.  The most interesting thing about WSOU is that we are heavy metal radio station at a Catholic University, and we’ve have been playing hard, active rock and metal since 1986!  Some people are surprised by this fact, but at WSOU make sure that our head banging music and the Catholic mission of the university coexist harmoniously.

What sets your station apart from other college radio stations?
There are several things that set WSOU apart from other college radio stations.  First. WSOU in the #1 market and our signal reaches the five borough of New York City as well as much of northern and central New Jersey.  WSOU is also set apart from other college radio stations because of our format. Many college stations have block programming, while we have a set format that includes specialty shows to include the variations of genres. Even then, the majority of our specialty shows are based on sub genres of metal/rock which aids in our unique niche in the market.  That niche is another thing that makes us different – WSOU is the only station in the market that is focused on metal and active rock and it has helped us build a positive reputation locally and nationally.  We also have plenty of alumni working in the broadcast and music industries, which allow the station to help current students through networking and internships.  We know we are fortunate because our alumni network is a […]

Station Spotlight: Hofstra University’s WRHU

Special thanks to Shannan Ferry, station manager, for answering the questions!

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
Radio Hofstra University 88.7 FM has been in existence for over 50 years. This is longer than any other noncommercial radio station on Long Island.  Originally the call letters were WHCH, then WVHC and for the last 25 years or so—WRHU. We have many alumni who stay connected with the station. A list of our alumni accomplishments can be found on our station website wrhu.org.  We do many formal and informal alumni netowkring events. Our current staff is about 200 students. We create a wide variety of shows. Indie rock, metal, hip hop, and country are some of the more popular music shows. We also produce and air a live half hour newscast every afternoon and have two hours of student hosted talk during morning drive. Journalism and especially sports journalism are two areas students have many opportunities to participate in at WRHU.

What sets your station apart from other college radio stations?
What sets WRHU apart is it’s the only student operated college radio station in the country to hold the broadcast rights of a professional sports franchise, the NHL’s New York Islanders.  At WRHU students are given a unique opportunity to do color commentary for NY Islanders broadcasts, report live from the locker room during / after games, and handle all production and engineering elements during live games.  Last season, WRHU’s student produced feed was simulcast on ESPN Radio 98.7 FM New York City and on WFAN during the Islanders run to the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals.  We are currently in our 4th season as the Islanders broadcast home and have produced […]

Station Spotlight: University of Tennessee’s Volunteer Channel

Special thanks to Mike Wiseman for answering the questions!

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
The Volunteer Channel is in it’s 18th year at the University of Tennessee. The Volunteer Channel is the official television station of the University of Tennessee. Completely run by UT students, TVC offers student produced programming, movies and community events 24-7. TVC reaches over 12,000 UT students & staff on campus (UT campus cable 64) and over 180,000 residents in Knox and surrounding counties on Comcast Digital Channel 194.

TVC exists to create informative, entertaining, and inspiring broadcast-quality television for the University of Tennessee and Knoxville community, while at the same time giving students real-life experience in television production and related fields.

What sets your station apart from other college TV stations?
Our TV station lets students with little to no experience learn what it’s like to work in a professional broadcast environment. I don’t know of many college stations that let freshman walk in the door on their first day of class and start using thousands of dollars worth of equipment! Students who work at our station leave with invaluable experience that can compete in any market.

Why did you choose to work at the TV station?
I’ve always known that I wanted to work in TV, and the first time I walked into our studio, I was hooked. I looked up to the older students and did everything I could to learn from them and build a path for my own future with TVC. Working at TVC was the number one best way for me to get hands-on experience in journalism before I was eligible for internships.

What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever done for your station?
Four […]

Station Spotlight: Millikin University’s WJMU

Special thanks to Ben Murrow, a Senior from Wheaton, Ill. and Program Director of WJMU for answering the questions.

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
WJMU 89.5 “The Quad” went live for the first time on March 10, 1971 because of six students that had a passion for radio. The first message broadcast was, “Hello Decatur, hello Millikin, hello world! You’re listening to the first broadcast of WJMU radio!” WJMU has been operated from three different locations on Millikin University’s campus over the years and it is now settled in the Richards Treat University Center. WJMU began broadcasting on a 100 watts license and could only be heard from 2 p.m. to midnight each day. “The Quad” is now fully automated around the clock, each day of the year and is licensed for 1,000 watt signal output. WJMU still functions with a relatively small staff, but impacts the Millikin and Decatur, IL community greatly with a variety of programming.

What sets your station apart from other college radio stations?
I believe that our programming is what sets us apart from other college radio stations. WJMU features shows that focus on sports, music and news, but more unique programs also have a strong presence. International programming that highlights Spanish, Bollywood and anime culture have been staples at WJMU. Music-centric shows are not uncommon to college radio, but WJMU has several genre based shows that are popular with our listeners: blues, classic rock, metal and 90’s music are examples. Some of Millikin’s music faculty even have a program solely dedicated to classical guitar. One other element that is new (and also old) to WJMU is our ability to play vinyl. We recently […]

Station Spotlight: Missouri Southern State University’s KGCS-TV

  Special thanks to Shonte Clay – Senior student worker of KGCS-TV Station at Missouri Southern State University for answering the questions!

Tell me a little history about your station and where your station is now?
Originally, our station was a cable access channel, established in 1984 as a service of the Department of Communications. The station became a broadcast station when KGCS-LP came about in January 1988. In September of 2008, KGCS moved to channel 22 and started broadcasting a digital signal allowing as reach of almost 170,000 households in the region. This was all possible due to the generous donation from the Ruth I. Koplin Foundation. In result, the studio was named Ruth Koplin. KGCS has come a long way over the years as it now produces a weekly news interview show, “Newsmakers,”  Southern Sports Sunday, student made programs, city council meetings and a variety of others. It has expanded in equipment, staff and also programming, nationally and locally. I am very proud to say I am a part of the KGCS broadcast family.

What sets your station apart from other college TV stations?
What sets our station apart from other stations is that our station gives students the access to almost whatever they want to do, hands-on, first-hand experience.  The majority of the programs and athletic events are run by students with assistance from faculty. The students have a lot of control and they are able to get started right away and learn as they go. Our station is surrounded by a lot of large, commercial TV stations as well, and this leads to lots of higher opportunities after graduating and opportunities for internships.

Why did you choose to work at the TV station?
I chose to […]