Radio station KSVR works to serve Spanish-speaking audience

Seated in a studio at KSVR 91.7 FM last week, Francisco Farias pulled off his headphones as he took a break from recording his weekly Spanish-language music and news radio show.

Farias, who started volunteering at the station a few months ago, believes the station’s Spanish-language programs have a big impact on Skagit County’s Latino community.

“For me, this is a great opportunity to help people who don’t speak English listen to the radio and hear news,” Farias said through an interpreter. “For me, a person who doesn’t understand too much English, there are a lot of people who listen to the station.”

Read more from GoSkagit.com.

The Bronc is first to broadcast live from Philadelphia Auto Show

107.7 The Bronc became the first college radio station to broadcast live at the Philadelphia Auto Show on Sunday, Jan. 29. The Bronc brought a team of students to the show to broadcast live from noon to 4 p.m. and promote the fifth largest auto show in the nation on social media.

More than 700 vehicles were on display on the 700,000 square foot display floor in the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The auto show staff contributed more than 30,000 on-site hours of labor setting up and removing displays.

Read more from Rider University.

The Sound of Emory: An Insight into WMRE

WMRE is Emory’s only radio station. Beginning as a mere idea in the early 1980s, in 1989 the station broadcasted its first show across campus through 590AM. Clear sounds didn’t last long on the AM channel, forcing the station to shift to a cable signal and then the internet, where it can be heard today. The shift in broadcasting also helped the clubs’s shift in production, and in 2008 they moved from the basement of a now-demolished Longstreet Hall to its current studio on the fifth floor of the Dobbs University Center (DUC).

Read more from The Emory Wheel.

WRUR delivers diversity in student taste and talent

Descending into the basement of Todd Union doesn’t feel how you might imagine walking into a radio station feels.

WRUR, residing in what were once the kitchen facilities for an ancient campus dining hall, puts students the push of a button away from an invisible audience of hundreds or thousands.

Hosting shows on both WRUR’s internet and FM platforms (The Sting and 88.5, respectively), student DJ’s dig into a wide variety of musical genres on their weekly broadcasts. The ease of access that WRUR offers leads to a high volume of DJs—about forty on The Sting and ten on FM—with all different tastes and musical perspectives

Read more from The Campus Times.

Campus radio station prepares for another big semester

A new semester means fresh ideas, new people and an updated schedule for student organizations. DJs at WGLZ, West Liberty’s radio station, are not wasting their time and have lined up some events for the campus community.

The station is bringing back some successful events and promotions from previous years.

“WGLZ listeners from last year may remember the WGLZ Bracket Contest for March Madness basketball.  The contest was popular among listeners with over 200 student entries competing for some really great prizes from Coca-Cola. This promotion will be back this semester,” said Jeff Pfister, director of WGLZ.

Read more from The Trumpet.

Plus, Radio Survivor visits new LPFM KPSQ-LP in Fayetteville and KUOZ-LP at University of the Ozarks and the College Radio Watch column